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Using wildcards in Business Processes and Routing Rules


Alisha
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Hello,

I was wondering if someone could help with this please. We have a Business Process and Routing Rule set up to raise a request automatically when a third party emails us.

The third party's email subject contains a long line of text and then the priority. The request is logged automatically and the original email subject line becomes the summary. The Business Process is set up to change the summary to something shorter but still including the priority.

We initially set up the Business Process with summary contains 'Priority = 1', 'Priority = 2', 'Priority = 3', etc.

However, the email subject line could now contain a number of different permutations  So we might receive any of the following within the subject line:

Priority = 1
Priority: 1
Priority - 1
Priority is 1

Is there a way we can put a wildcard in between the word Priority and the number 1, so that we don't have to add so many different 'contains' criteria in the Business Process?

Similarly, for the routing rule, we have several subject LIKE '%Priority = 1%' OR subject LIKE '%Priority: 1%' OR subject LIKE '%Priority = 2%' OR subject LIKE '%Priority: 2%' and so on. Can we include a wildcard here as well?

Many thanks,
Alisha

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I haven't tried this but assume you can use something like this in your mail routings:

subject LIKE 'Priority%1' 

OR

subject LIKE '%Priority%1%'

I don't think theres a limit to how many '%' you can use. This just represents 0 or more characters.

 

Regards

 

Keith

 

 

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@Alisha - I would go with @Keith's advice however I would say to be aware of the following: having multiple wildcards in a LIKE expression is not 100% fail proof, for what you are trying to achieve. You could have an expression as: subject LIKE '%Priority%1%' which can catch expression such as "Priority(1)", "Priority 1", "Priority: 1", "Priority Level 1", etc. However it can also catch expression such as "Priority 9 for user 1", "Priority 91", etc. As you can see, judging the expression the latter examples, the emails are intended as Priority 9 but they will match a Priority 1 criteria if built like that. The best solution is to actually ensure that the emails are sent using a set pattern such a "Priority: N" without any deviations. This would only be possible though if you can control the source of these emails...

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