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Paul Davis

Hornbill Staff
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Paul Davis last won the day on November 28 2014

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About Paul Davis

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    Head of Client Services

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    London, UK

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  1. Hi Giuseppe, Sorry we didn't notice this earlier. Someone from Support will be in touch directly very shortly. For future reference, there is no service level for items raised on the forums and for a guaranteed swift reply, an enhanced Success Plan, like Premier Success is required. Issues can then be raised on our website at https://www.hornbill.com/support/ . You do subscribe to this service and so I have gone ahead and raised a request for you. You can also track the progress of your requests on our Success Portal at https://success.hornbill.com/hornbill/
  2. Hi Dave, If customers choose not to subscribe to an enhanced Hornbill Success Plan such as Premier Success, then they default onto Essential Success. This is centred around our Community Forums and is included in the basic subscription price. However, no defined service level are applied to issues reported here and although Hornbill developers and Customer Success make significant contributions to our Customer Forums, these are on an as-and-when basis. Critical availability issues relating to our Cloud infrastructure are covered in Essential Success and these will be picked up by the comprehensive monitoring tools used by our Cloud Team and worked on with the expected urgency around the clock on the rare occasions they occur. It is, of course, possible though that a reported major incident might not be attributable to an issue with the Cloud infrastructure and instead might have a root cause relating to the platform or application software. The Premier Success Plan allows customers to raise these, and all types of incidents via our website, with the comfort of knowing these will be handled by a dedicated team and subject to published service levels for response and resolution. In addition to that, to help get more out of the solution, the Premier Success Plan also includes the additional Expert Services time which you mention. For further details of our Success Plans, please refer to the following wiki page: https://wiki.hornbill.com/index.php/Success_Plans Hope that helps. We will also be in touch directly about this shortly.
  3. Hi again @Keith I’m getting back to you in relation to your question about our process and also to provide an update with the particular defect at the heart of this post. I would also like to thank you for the feedback. It has helped us refine what we do and is a good example of how we, at Team Hornbill, can leverage the community forums to provide a better service As I am sure everyone who reads this discussion appreciates, where software is involved, providing an accurate timeframe for the resolution of a defect can often prove to be notoriously difficult. In part, this is due to the complexities involved, but also estimation is, in my experience, not a skill that developer’s typically excel at. As a result, estimates are usually either hopelessly optimistic or with so much padding that they are of little to no value. We have up until now relied on our ability to turn issues around very quickly, helped by our agile approach to software development. However, I do appreciate that sometimes, as in this case, this leaves an expectation gap for the customer. In terms of new feature development, we only commit to new features when we add them to our 90-day queue. For customers with an Enhanced Success Plan, you can review the 90-day queue for Service Manager on the Success Portal. These customers can also see published defects, indicate that they are also affected and will soon be able to see a status which indicates progress on each. In addition to this, we have reviewed our support process and for those with an Enhanced Success Plan will also now be indicating not just the defect reference to find on the Success Portal as we do now, but also its priority and the average time to delivery for defects of the same priority over the last 90-days. The average time to delivery of recent defects is an observed metric and so I believe will prove to be more useful than any estimate that might be provided. For critical issues, there will of course be additional and more regular feedback. I hope these improvements put your mind to rest on this matter and again would like to thank you for your feedback. Keep it coming! Paul
  4. Hi @Keith, following up on the earlier comment with an update at the end of the day. I am still reviewing this with the team and will also post back with the clarification requested. Obviously, there is also the small matter of the defect you are referring to and I'll review its status with Development.
  5. Hi @Keith , Sounds like something went very wrong here. I'll look into this and get back with a more detailed reply by close of business.
  6. Paul Davis

    Hornbill INSIGHTS 2018

    Hi Darren, In order to provide everyone sufficient notice we currently expect the first event to take place in the latter half of May. Watch this space (or one very nearby) for formal notification of details of the program. Regards, Paul
  7. Paul Davis

    Hornbill INSIGHTS 2018

    @Keith We had set some provisional dates internally a little while back, but had not as yet finalised and communicated externally. As you say, where we are now this is not very much notice. That said, I do expect there will be a formal communication about this shortly. Watch this space!
  8. Paul Davis

    Updating On-Hold Calls

    Hi @Martyn Houghton, there was a problem with the 90d display in the portal and that is being looked at. Unfortunately, this particular feature is still there and so has missed our target by quite a bit now. However, if you could see the correct version of the 90d board that I can see internally, you would see that it is next up on Development's list.
  9. Paul Davis

    Build No 1119 - CH00149429

    @Tina.Lapere This doesn't directly address your concern, but the image you attached raised a question for me. Please forgive me asking if you really want to make those types of updates visible to your customers? If not the default visibility can be set differently using application settings in the Admin Tool. This does not affect all updates and those triggered from automated tasks in the BPM can be set independently. Apologies, if I am just stating something you already know, but I thought it worth asking the question.
  10. Paul Davis

    Build No 1119 - CH00149429

    @Tina.LapereThanks for the feedback! Obviously, the main reason for making this change was to make the fact these updates are customer-facing more visible to users in the first place. It would be useful to gather feedback from others in the community about this.
  11. Paul Davis

    Response timer report

    @chrisnutt Thanks for your post, which I have just seen. I'm glad to see you've made progress on your query, albeit without assistance from the community this time around. As is the nature of Community Support, sometimes not everything gets an answer as quickly as is needed. We do try to answer as many questions as we can in as timely a fashion as we can, but sometimes things do get missed. If this is a problem we encourage customers to take a look at our enhanced Success Plans, which provide appropriate service levels and so a guaranteed and timely response (see the main page on our Wiki for details). Once again, apologies for the inconvenience on this occasion.
  12. Paul Davis

    Updating On-Hold Calls

    Hi Lee, Just to expand a little on the update by James above, this feature is indeed on our 90-day development queue for Service Manager. Although this forum thread has been open for some time, the feature request was moved from the general backlog to the 90-day development queue on 12th September. As the name suggests, we aim to deliver functionality that makes it to the 90-day development queue within 90-days. Looking back at functionality delivered in 2017 we have been reasonably successful in that endeavour, with 86% delivered within this target and nearly half of those features delivered within 30-days of making it to the queue. Unfortunately, a quick calculation will reveal that at 92-days, this is one of the few features we've put on our development queue that has not met this target. As James indicated we hope to commence work on it soon. Incidentally, you can see what features are on the development queue if you log into our Success Portal. This view is updated every time a new build for Service Manager is released. Regards, Paul
  13. Paul Davis

    Schema changes

    Yes, this was a breaking change that should not have happened and so please accept my apologies for the disruption and inconvenience. I think its appreciated that from time-to-time mistakes occur, although in this particular case it would seem that the ''mistake' was intentional and I understand why that is of concern. It is important to us here at Hornbill that we ensure that the updates provided to the Hornbill platform and applications are seamless and this change was not compatible with that philosophy. I will be discussing with the Development team measures to prevent a similar reoccurrence in the future. On the immediate issue, I have also asked Product Specialists to get in touch in the morning about resolving this.
  14. Innovation: The Hornbill Hackathon and are innovation days right for you? After being inspired by a talk from Dan Pink about staff motivation, I introduced the already tried and tested concept of a 24-hr innovation day to Hornbill. The first Hornbill Hackathon was held back in July 2011 and as I write this we have recently completed our ninth. For those not completely familiar with these types of events, this blog post will outline what happens during a Hornbill Hackathon and explain what their purpose is and why this might be of interest to you. Put simply, a Hornbill Hackathon is all about innovation and setting aside 24-hrs to explore, more or less, any idea you want. The idea should be in some small way be pertinent to the business, but this is a pretty loose restriction. For example, today one developer explored a Fantasy Football App for Hornbill. Clearly, not a strategic priority for us, but the developer was using the time as a learning exercise to try out different UI development techniques, so that comfortably qualifies as being relevant to the business. A Hornbill Hackathon typically starts at 1pm on a Thursday, finishing at the same time on Friday. The whole Development team, including those who didn’t take part then gathers for the informal show-and-tells and to vote for three finalists. Those finalists then demo their Hackathon Projects to a panel of invited guests that includes Gerry, our CEO and a winner is chosen. Very short videos are produced for each Hackathon Project, so that people who couldn’t attend get to see what was done. All those involved find it a fantastic event and a fair number of developers work well into the night, crashing out on sofas or in conference rooms at three or four in the morning. The truly hardcore work on throughout. I’ve hosted every event so far and wouldn’t miss it for anything. As mentioned before, those participating can choose to do what they want. A free and autonomous choice here is important. In the early days, I remember being asked why we couldn’t use this time to get X or Y or some other special project done. However, this misses the point. If someone is told what they should do or what they might want to do (wink, wink), well that’s just work isn’t it? There has been a couple of occasions where someone has really wanted to participate, but struggled to come up with an idea themselves. If this happens its perfectly fine for others in the team to put forward suggestions. Often, people pair up and work on an idea together. The Hornbill Hackathon is about a number of things. It is an opportunity to try out that brilliant or crazy idea you have, to sharpen-the-saw or just some time to go away and refactor that code or business process that you could never find the time to do. Your choice. A question I have also heard about the Hornbill Hackathon is what comes out of it? Materially, that is. Some things I can name off the top of my head are prototype apps and proof-of-concepts for Hornbill Mobile, Employee Recognition and Holiday & Absence Booking. Development time for those Hackathon projects was subsequently set aside and all have since made it into production use, albeit the last two have only been made available for internal use. Nonetheless, even if that hadn’t have been the case, the return on investment on innovation is not always immediate or easily measured. Consider for example, Sir James Dyson, who spent five years creating 5,126 failed prototypes before one finally came good. Or, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos who proudly declared that he’d made 'billions of dollars of failures'. The last time I looked both seemed to be doing just fine. The saying goes that Failure is not an option. Indeed, it is not: failure is a prerequisite . Of course, there is also an element of luck that accompanies rewarded perseverance and whilst the origin of the quote ‘the harder I work, the luckier I get’ is unclear, the sentiment still rings true. Many might already be aware that Alexander Fleming discovered penicillin by accident. However, few might know that Coca-Cola came about from experimenting to find an opium-free alternative to morphine, or that Post-it notes , microwave ovens  and X-rays also were discovered by chance. The key point here is that these discoveries were all made whilst already in the innovation-zone, so to speak. By creating and fostering an innovation-friendly environment, the very process of exploring new ideas and methods can result in ‘stumbling’ into something different or providing a catalyst for someone else to. Furthermore, the benefits from Hornbill Hackathons are not just evidenced by monetized additions to the Hornbill App Store. They might be found in an improved business process and the productivity gain it yields or the knowledge acquired and applied from learning something new. In the short term, it might just be by improving team morale from simply providing an outlet for creative voices within the business as Dan Pink outlined. Of course, Hackathon Days do not by themselves an innovative company make. There is much more to it than that and the most important thing is an environment and culture that nurtures innovation and can tolerate failure. I have always taken to heart the belief that making mistakes is not something to be avoided at all costs but making the same mistake twice is. Naturally, mistakes do need to be cleaned up with appropriate speed and humility, particularly where customers are involved. However, if these rules are adhered to and as long as the mistake wasn’t the result of an illegal, immoral, or reckless act, then don’t panic and carry on.  Naturally, there is also a delicate balance between velocity and credibility to be had there, one which even Facebook came to realise whilst somewhat awkwardly stepping back from their  'move fast and break things' mantra. All types of businesses must innovate to survive and the faster and more competitive the market they operate in is, the more aggressively they need to innovate. It helps if innovation is not simply seen as the concern of techy types, as it applies just as equally to Support, Marketing and other areas of the business. Consequently, Hornbill Hackathons are open to anyone and often include support analysts and product specialists amongst others as participants. Whilst I am now responsible for Customer Success and Client Services at Hornbill, I have spent most of my career in Software Development. I am not saying that transition was easy, but it was surprising how many of the skills and principles I had previously applied were readily transportable. If you think an innovation day like the Hornbill Hackathon would work for you then that would be fantastic. More importantly, if this has made you think that there is perhaps something more your team or business can or should be doing in respect to innovating, then this blog has been worthwhile and the ball is in your court now. Just before signing off, you might be wondering what type of Hackathon projects were undertaken in our latest event. In addition to the one I mentioned earlier, there was one that investigated sending text messages from within a business process and another which recommended collaboration content similar to that just posted. It would be remiss of me to not reiterate the disclaimer that neither of these Hackathon Projects are roadmapped and so may or may not ever make it into production. As I mentioned earlier to focus on that alone would be to miss a broader point, although as it turns out I am particularly optimistic regarding one or two of the projects. Watch this space!
  15. Paul Davis

    Set / View priority against activities

    Occasionally we miss some forum posts and this would appear to be one of those times. Off the back of this discussion, I've just posted some clarification about how to guarantee a timely response to an unanswered forum post in a more visible location. Hope this helps.
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